UF professor reports organic food no better for kids

 A recent study shows that organic foods may not be as superior as people may believe.

It’s no secret organic foods have become increasingly more popular as alternatives to conventionally produced foods for kids. But people may be surprised to hear what little difference exists between the two.

Janet Silverstein

Dr. Janet Silverstein, professor and chief of pediatric endocrinology at Shands at UF, has a heart for childhood health. For more than 30 years she has worked to better the lives of children suffering from diabetes.

Dr. Janet Silverstein, professor and chief of pediatric endocrinology at Shands at UF, has a heart for childhood health. For more than 30 years, she has worked to better the lives of children suffering from diabetes.

A recent study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics concluded organic food is no more nutritional than regular food.

Silverstein, who co-authored the report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, says almost every available study of dairy, produce and meat products supports this claim, even considering environmental factors.

Although the nutritional value isn’t of much consideration, it’s still understood that organic foods receive less exposure to pesticides and other contaminants.

Silverstein says researchers need to conduct more research on the impact of pesticides in order to determine if they’re safe or if there are any long-term effects.

To read the full-length article, visit NBCNews.com.

—David Williams (3PR)

Learn more about Silverstein’s work

To learn more about Dr. Silverstein’s heart behind her work, check out a Q&A session from last year: Q&A on childhoon Diabetes. For more examples of her work and her department’s work here at UF, read this story about UF’s battle with diabetes.

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2 Responses to “UF professor reports organic food no better for kids”
  1. Melanie Simmons @ Atlanta Pediatrician says:

    Excuse me for chiming in, but thought to comment a bit. USA Today quoted Joel Forman, co-author of this report and an associate professor of pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital, as saying:

    “The report does cite lower pesticides in organic produce and potentially lower risk of exposure to drug-resistant bacteria, but the needed long-term studies do not yet exist to show that eating pesticide-free food makes people healthier.”

    In other words, no long-term study? That’s why I would take the study with a grain of salt and doubt the scientific spirit it was made in. Way too often these days the scientific spirit bends under the winds of various industry interests :)

  2. jason says:

    I grow organic food and whether it is better for you or not I’m not too fussed, but what I have found is my kids will eat organic vegetables a lot more than the non organic versions.

    Last Christmas I did an experiment as I had 11 people around for dinner where I cooked up organic and non-organic carrots and served them up. Interestingly, people had left the non organic carrots and eaten the organic ones.

    I personally feel that eating food that hasn’t been sprayed in pesticide and fed artificial fertilizers has to be better for you in the long term. I’m currently expanding my home food production and planning to grow even more for the year round next year.

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